Toy Soldiers

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Ron Gallo (Toy Soldiers)

SXSW in Austin can be an incredible musical experience or it can be incredibly frustrating, depending how everything falls for you.  A friend had told me I needed to catch Toy Soldiers there.  I checked them out and really liked their sound, but it did not look like our schedules would align this time.  On Friday Night, I made one of the best choices I’ve ever made at a SXSW visit.  I went to the Communion Music showcase at St. David’s church. A guy I know started Communion Music.  I remember when it was primarily for he and his friends to do solo shows of their own material. St. David’s is a beautiful venue.  The crowd was silent the whole night and it was an incredible line-up; Lucius, The Staves, Lucy Rose, Leif Vollebekk, Joe Banfi and Half Moon Run.  I enjoyed being in one place all night with a silent crowd that I wanted to do the same thing the following day. Sofar Sounds puts on intimate house shows in cities all over the world. I’ve been wanting to attend one in Dallas but my schedule never worked out. I showed up for the show and Toy Soldiers were one of the groups playing.  They put on a great set.  Fun, Rocking, entertaining + they were from Philly, my old hometown. They are working on their next album, “The Maybe Boys”, and you can be part of their album. Now, I’m thrilled to introduce you to the frontman for Toy Soldiers, Ron Gallo.

Name: Ron Gallo
Home Town: Philadelphia, PA
Most recent release: “Tell the Teller” EP
Band Affiliation: Toy Soldiers

BIO:
Philadelphia based human that fronts the Rock N’ Roll band Toy Soldiers. Also, relentless solo performer, show host, amateur basketball player posing as a professional musician, vehicular narcoleptic and chicken enthusiast.

What is your songwriting/composing process?

It’s a lot like blacking out and waking up the next morning with a bunch of various sweet treats in your arms. And some of those sweet treats are fresh and some are rotten. In the sense that I’ll sit down with some sort of instrument and then somehow a few minutes later i’ll have a song or two but not remember exactly how i got there. I have a very nonchalant approach to writing where it just kind of happens and I don’t try to write but I just make myself available for a song to happen.

Some songs come from singing something while riding a bike then taking out my iphone voice memo to remember it then rush home to work it out. Some songs come from playing some chords first and matching it with some gibberish I’ve written in a notebook. Some songs I’ll listen to someone else’s song and find some obscure way to rip them off so no one knows. Some songs just plain suck.

What are you most proud of?
Songs that I can still sing and mean it. The lighthearted ones with a good sense of humor as well as the pained ones that came directly from some sort of very real moment or heartbreak. They’re on opposite sides of the spectrum but I feel everything in between was afraid to commit one way or another.

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?

Right now I think this is great: (Father John Misty “Funtimes in Babylon”)

I would like to abuse my lungs
Smoke everything inside with every girl I’ve ever loved
Ride around the wreckage on a horse knee-deep in mud
Look out Hollywood, here I come

What advice would you give to young songwriters/composers?
Don’t think to much, or at all. You can’t sit down with the intention of writing the greatest song in the world. Just write songs, lots of them, about nonsense if you have nothing else to say and eventually great things will start to happen. Keep it simple, no one cares about technical for the sake of being technical. Have fun, love it, live it, be honest, don’t force it and be your damn self.

Ron (Toy Soldiers) on the Web
Toy Soldiers
Ron Gallo
Toy Soldiers “The Maybe Boys” Kickstarter
Toy Soldiers Facebook
Twitter: @toysoldiersband @ronjgallo

Bonus Materials

To view Ron’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

I truly appreciate everyone that has stopped by, talked about this blog and/or shared with friends. Please continue to share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

Mike

 

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John Lefler

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John Lefler

In full disclosure, John Lefler is a very good friend of mine.  I’m headed to his house tonight. So, does this mean that I’m only interviewing people I know? Nope.  Does it mean that my life is filled with many extremely talented people that I’m glad to know? Yes, without a doubt.

Let me introduce you to John,

Name: John Lefler
Current City: Dallas, TX
Label: Good Hang
Most recent release: “Shout Fire EP” – 2012, also recently appeared on Treefallsounds’, “There’s No Local Scene Finer,” 2013 compilation, benefiting the students of W.E. Greiner
Band Affiliation: John Lefler, The Trimbles, Revolution 9, Camille Cortinas, Dashboard Confessional

Brief introduction:
Texas-based artist, John Lefler, has an extensive musical resume to say the least.  As the guitarist for Dashboard Confessional, John has toured for the past decade alongside an impressive solo career of his own.  Currently promoting his sophomore EP, “Shout Fire“, the followup to his previous release in 2009, “Better By Design“, Lefler has garnered notable reviews and tours regularly.  He describes his music as “rock and roll, albeit a lighter 30-something version”, and does not reject a likeness to “power pop”.  With obvious talent, an excellent sense of humor and self, and an honest ability to charm crowds, Lefler is an artist to keep on your radar.

What is your songwriting process?
The songwriting process is probably the worst process in the World – possibly worse than fracking. For me, it generally starts with a simple moment of musical inspiration, which then has to be hammered into shape over the course of days, months, years, or decades. I always start with music – and by that I mean the melody. Writing lyrics is such a pain in the ass, that unless I feel strongly about the tune, I won’t even bother attempting words. Having said that, my best songs are generally the most effortless. My favorite song from my last EP was written, words and music, in about 30 minutes. It took me about 5 months to stop writing it, though. I can say without hyperbole that there are around 25 completed and unused bridges. Oh, and I bounce a rubber ball around the house when I write.

What are you most proud of?
For me, pride comes completely from songwriting. All the success and accolade in the world can’t make a shitty song good – at least in my mind (though I am proven wrong everyday, by music critics who should know better). If an album contains three, or four songs that, 10 years later, I can believe in and still play in my live set, then that’s good enough for me. It’s a percentage that worked pretty well for The Eagles…

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?
“People will always be tempted to wipe their feet on anything with, ‘welcome,’ written on it.”-
Andy Partridge

What advice would you give to young songwriters?
I am not a legendary songwriter, so I feel a bit silly giving advice. However, if I had to, I would tell them that songwriting is a craft. It’s a skill that is acquired and, hopefully, kept sharp. I would advise against being one of those musicians that says, “I don’t want to learn the rules because it will stifle me as an artist.” The groundwork of this profession (or hobby) has been laid by men and women that are much more talented than we are. Learn from them. Don’t just learn ten chords and feel like you’ve, “got it.” Also, technology is a tool. It can’t write a song for you. 99% percent of all great songs ever written can be performed with just a voice and guitar, or piano.

For someone who doesn’t like to give advice, I’m very comfortable on a soapbox.

John on the Web
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Facebook
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Bonus Materials

To view John’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

I truly appreciate everyone that has stopped by, talked about this blog and/or shared with friends. Please continue to share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

Only two posts next week, but they’re bands I’m excited to share with you.  Both are groups I’ve met through this blog.

Mike

 

 

Kristin Center

Songwriting, Piano, Dallas, California, Santa Monica

Kristin Center

Prejudging someone is a huge mistake.  Yet we all do it now and then, even though we know it’s wrong.  My wife and I were at Opening Bell Coffee (which apparently is a recurring theme in my blog this week) listening to some music, as we frequently do.  A woman with blonde hair was in the back by herself and focused on the performer.  I, in passing, thought she must be the girlfriend of the singer on stage.  My wife went and got some Iced Tea from the back and said, “Do you know that girl in the back? She said she’s a musician and is new in town. I told her you would come back and talk to her” Now, I love that there are hobbyist musicians in the world.  I wish there were as many “weekend musicians” as there were “weekend golfers”. I think the world would be a better place if we had more people making and supporting music. But, I just don’t want to talk to ALL of them, especially when I’m out listening to music. So, based on faulty reasoning, I went back expecting a hobbyist and introduced myself.  You can tell instantly, by how someone talks about music and writing if they are serious about it. I knew instantly that Kristin was very serious about music and writing.  Just in a brief conversation I knew that this was a very intelligent person who was strongly passionate about the things she believes in.  I’m proud to introduce all of you to Kristin now.

Current City: Santa Monica, CA
Label: Independent
Recent release: Kickstarter project started May 30th (still funding!)

Kristin Center is an American concert pianist, contemporary art-song composer and singer-songwriter known for her unusual writing style that combines Latin funk and Impressionist Classical forms with a fierce lyrical message of open your mind.

I really like the theme for your Kickstarter and the idea of doing a video album, instead of a traditional CD.  How did that all come together?
The concept of fusing the music portion of the project with something completely separate that I’m passionate about really has been in fruition for years. This kickstarter project was the perfect time to join them.

Video really adds a whole other level of connection with a song. Also, I think part of working in any competitive field is understanding what is unique about you. Everyone does an album on kickstarter. Why would I want to be one of the masses.

What is your songwriting/composing process?
The process? If I have time, I write. There will never be a “writer’s block” for me. It’s a very logical process of

1) play Piano,
2) write something.

Now, it takes a lot of writing for me find something I like. I usually sleep on it, for months, and then come back and say, “Nah, I don’t like it anymore.” I probably use about 4% of my ideas. Even when those ideas morph into full songs, I sometimes let them go if they don’t feel right on stage.


How did a trained concert pianist become a songwriter?
I think it was actually the other way around! I was first a by-ear musician. When I started at the piano I started with sounds, not notes on a page. So I wrote a lot of music without ever writing it down. I still do.

My parents saw that out of all the art forms they introduced me to, I was mostly drawn to music. And out of all the instrument affairs I’ve had, I’ve always come home to the piano. I’m a pretty obsessive person, so early on when it came time to really “take on” the piano, for me there was no question but to learn the instrument to the best of my ability. Classical music gradually became a wonderful compositional influence as well as a technique training ground.

What are you most proud of?
I’m proud to be someone who believes in things. I’m proud that I always have something to say, and am never afraid to speak up. Above all, I’m thankfully proud that I’m able to speak everything that I believe competently through music.

What are your favorite songwriting lyrics?
By Others-

So out on the tide we go, knowing it will turn,
And all I really want to do, is find a way to go on through.”
Peter Gabriel/AfroCelt Sound System
Less is more in a lot of ways with lyrics (coming from someone who has to rap to get everything out occasionally!). I also never hear lyrics without music. Listen to the song when you read these!
Mine-

I’ll let someone else choose that. A fan picked out, “my translucent beauty is forever in the shade.” I looked at it again and thought, “yeah, that’s pretty good.” 🙂

What advice would you give to young songwriters/composers?

Play your heart out, be as honest as possible, and remember to look at yourself from your audience’s perspective. Would you pay money for your show?

What have you found is the hardest thing when you commit to music as a career?

The hardest is the acceptance that now the actual music will most likely come second, music business will come first. Some people have definitely been dealt a lucky set of cards, but for those of us born completely out of the music loop (and out of the money loop!), you have to be able to pick up a lot of well-rounded skills, quickly. Oh, yeah, and you can never have a bad day in public.

KRISTIN ON THE WEB

Twitter

Bonus Materials
To view Kristin’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

Thanks for stopping by.  Please share this page and site with fellow music lovers. See you back soon,

Mike

Levi Weaver

Songwriting

Levi Weaver

I want to introduce you to Levi Weaver. Levi and I have several mutual friends.  I had heard about him for a while. I was so moved when I finally saw him at Opening Bell Coffee in Dallas that I wrote a song based around the layers of things he builds using the looping pedal at his live performances.  We will also be forever connected by a late night at SXSW involving a silent disco in an enchanted forest.  If you ever run into either of us, ask us about that story.

Name- Levi Weaver
Current City- Nashville, TN
Label- None yet
Most recent release- Last Official release was “I Am Only a Tiny Noise”, in Spring of 2012

Brief introduction
Hi, my name is Levi Weaver. I get uncomfortable in rooms with lots of people unless they’re all looking at me, and I don’t know the answer to “what kind of music do you make?” but I get asked that all the time. Someone once told me I should answer that I make soundtracks to existential crises, but I also like making friends, so I’ve kept that one mostly holstered.

What is your songwriting process?
Step one: get sad or think about eternity and space and what it means to be a self-aware being
Step two: songs

(This really is the only consistency in my method, everything else is kind of chaos)

What are you most proud of?
Today, my son was in the kitchen humming Daft Punk (WHERE DID HE HEAR THAT) and then sang these words: “We walk on accident sun, We walk on accident sun, We walk on accident sun, We walk on Mexican ducky”. I’ll never top that. He’s half me, and still manages to be awesome, so until three weeks ago, he was what I was most proud of, but UPDATE: it’s now a tie, though Holland(3 week old)’s stories mostly involve poop, and that’s not a good interview answer.

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?
*shuffles papers, spins chair, adjusts glasses, clears throat*

We walk on accident sun, We walk on accide

Kidding. Honestly, though – I could give you an entire book of lyrics that I love, but to pick one favorite is an impossible task, so I’ll give you two new ones I discovered within the last month:
1. David Ramirez, The Forgiven: “You’re just a songwriter, you ain’t a preacher. We came to mourn you, not to look in the mirror. Sing about those hard times, sing about those women. We love the broken, not the forgiven.”

2. Casey Black, Fire, Fire, Fire: “This all began when someone liked a piece of land and thought to make a border. This all began when someone said ‘Hey man, don’t blame me, I’m only following orders’. This all began when someone said ‘We are we, and they are they, and we are normal’. This all began when someone said ‘Hey, do you disagree?’ and someone else said ‘yeah… sorta’.”

What advice would you give to young songwriters?
The best advice I ever got about songwriting didn’t come from another songwriter, it came from a comedian (I wish I could remember who), who said (I’m paraphrasing), “it takes ten years to find your voice. You’ll struggle, and you’ll accidentally copy other people, and you’ll be really awful at first, and then somewhere around ten years, you’ll discover your voice, and by then – if you’ve been plugging away, and practicing, you’ll be ready.”

I don’t think it necessarily takes that long with songwriters, but it does take a long time. You really are going to be pretty awful for awhile, even if you have a great voice and even if you’re a good writer, unless you’re some kind of savant. Don’t get discouraged by that. I’ve never understood how in every other profession, you go to school and then do an internship, and then after years and years, you become an expert, but in the arts, people act like they should be Paul McCartney by the time they’re twenty. It’s a skill, just like anything else, albeit one that is intensely personal and vulnerable.

All (ALL. I am not exaggerating about this) all of my favorite singer-songwriters that I’ve ever talked to are absolutely riddled with self-doubt. Embrace that early. If you know ahead of time that you’re not going to be good and you have no choice but to play and write and sing anyway, in spite of the nerves, in spite of the discomfort and embarrassment and social anxiety, just because it’s just in you and HAS to get out, then you’re in the right game. Knowing it ahead of time sorta braces you against crushing disappointment right out of the gates, too.

Levi on the Web
Website
Facebook
Twitter
and most importantly, Levi is nearing the end of a fan funded drive to complete his next album.  Please be a part of this process if you can and share with any other music loving friends. Here is the link: http://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/leviweaver

Oh and….. there’s a lovely post about Levi that our friends at Music is My First Language did a couple of years back.  You should stop by and read that too, I think you’ll enjoy it.

http://musicismyfirstlanguage.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/the-moments-that-count-levi-weaver/

Bonus Materials

To view Levi’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

I truly appreciate everyone that has stopped by, talked about this blog and/or shared with friends. Please continue to share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

See you back soon,

Mike

Shane Alexander

Our Scattered Words Blog June 21, 2013

Shane Alexander

Shane Alexander is from Los Angeles, California. His most recent album “Ladera” was released by BuddhaLand Records (USA) and Suburban/Harlem Recordings (Benelux).  He has also performed with the group The Greater Good.

BIO
I’m an independent singer/songwriter/performer/producer with 5 full length solo records and an EP to date.  I have toured internationally since 2005, played many of the stages I’d always dreamed I would, and opened for many of my biggest influences.  I feel truly blessed to do what I love.

What is your songwriting process?
It varies, but I definitely put time in every day.  I generally play and sing at least 1-3 hours every morning and often just come up with ideas on the spot – recording them quickly in their roughest form onto my phone.  I do the same when I tour.  I find trains always get me into a poetic, lyrical mindset.  I take all my recorded fragments and listen to them while I’m at the gym or in the car, find the ones that have the most potential and work from there.  Sometimes the songs come out fully-formed in one sitting, which is always a gift, but more often they take some time.  I do a number of co-writes, and in a co-write setting, my lyrics come faster than I can write them and I almost always have a song completed within a few hours.

What are you most proud of?
My daughter would surely be my #1, but career wise, I suppose I’m most proud of having carved out a career and a growing international fanbase on my own terms.

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?
Ever?  “Just what you want to be, you will be in the end” (written by Justin Hayward) from The Moody Blues’  “Nights in White Satin”, which is still one of my all-time favorite songs. I heard the song often as a child, and that lyric became sort of a mantra for me.  The production on that song is pure magic. There has never been a recording with more spook.

..of my own? That’s tough – first one to come to mind is from a tune called “Carrollton” on my last record – “the past is dressed in Sunday clothes, in picture frames, in dusty rows and put in rooms where no one goes to see them.”

What advice would you give to young songwriters?
Don’t suck and don’t quit! If being a songwriter is what you truly want to do, then do it.  Write honest music. Write constantly. You will NEVER have as much free time as you have in your teens and early 20’s, so don’t squander it.  Be prepared to hear the word NO a lot, but never accept it.  Be known for being badass, professional and likable.  Believe in your own abilities, because if you don’t, you will never convince anyone else to.  Work on your voice, your rhythm, your lyrics and your playing DAILY because it isn’t possible to be too good.  Seek out things that make you happy.

Shane on the Web
Website
Facebook Page
Twitter

If you’re anywhere near Ventura, California today (June 21, 2013) and you’d like to see Shane play live you’re in luck! Shane and John Elliott (who is also an incredible singer/songwriter that I hope to interview in the future) are playing at Zoey’s Cafe.  Please stop by and see them.

Bonus Materials

To view Shane’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

Thanks for stopping by.  It’s been an incredible week and I truly appreciate everyone that has stopped by, talked about this blog and/or shared with friends. Please continue to share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

See you back soon,

Mike

Dan Haerle

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Now for something (or someone) completely different…..

Dan Haerle is a legendary Jazz musician and educator.  He’s one of the primary reasons that myself, and many other musicians, came to Denton, Texas to attend North Texas State University (now known as UNT).  I’ve had the honor of working with him as a colleague that past few years also.

Dan Haerle currently resides in Denton.  His most recent release, “Live at Luminous Sound” was released by Seagull Recordings and featured his group, The Dan Haerle Quartet.

BIO
Dan Haerle was a faculty member in the Jazz Studies Division of the College of Music at the University of North Texas for 34 years. He has recorded many Jamey Aebersold play-alongs, has several jazz text books published, is an active jazz clinician nationally and internationally. Dan has performed with artists such as Dave Liebman and Pat Metheny and, in 1975, he toured the U. S. and Europe with the Clark Terry Quintet.  Dan was inducted into the IAJE “Hall of Fame” In 2003, He was awarded a LeJENd of Jazz Education distinction in 2012.

What is your songwriting/composing process?
No set approach. Sometimes I start with a melody and add chords later, sometimes I write a chord progression and add the melody later. Sometimes I find myself playing a piece at the piano and then write it down.

What are you most proud of?
My daughter. And a 40 minute piece I wrote under a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1976 for piano and symphony orchestra.

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?
Lorenz Hart’s lyrics with Richard Rodgers music like Mountain Greenery, “There’s no keener reception in this greenery…”

How do you decide on Chords to match your melody?
Any chord root can go with any melody note and generally I pick chords with strong functions that establish keys like II-V-I progressions, etc. Also, I like stepwise progressions, either rising or falling by 1/2 steps.

What advice would you give to young songwriters/composers?
Write a lot of music but have a big wastebasket! Every note you write is not going to be sacred! Also, if you are not sure about what to do with a work in progress, put it aside and return to it days, weeks, months, even years later!

Dan on the web
http://www.DanHaerle.com

Bonus Materials

To view Dan’s selected playlist and other bonus items, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

Thanks for stopping by.  Please share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

See you back soon,

Mike

Camille Cortinas

songwriting, our scattered words

(photo by Jonathan Holloway. Taken at The Kessler Theater)

In full disclosure, this post is about one of my favorite people around and a good friend.  It’s only natural (side note; wouldn’t it be great to include an interview with Neil Finn later on] at the beginning of an interview blog that the first few would be people I already know. Here we go with our second interview…

Camille Cortinas is a singer/songwriter and entrepreneur from Dallas, Texas.  She self-releases her albums

Her recent release is “You’re Home Now”‘  (A song inspired by her adoption of a shelter dog. Proceeds go to benefit DFW Humane Society) It’s available at http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/camillecortinas4.

Band affiliations; Fishing For Comets (past band)
performs & records with local talents
Dogdander, John Lefler (he’s been referred to in both posts so far), The Monco Poncho, San Pedro, Gabrielle LaPlante, Cas Haley.

BIO
Songwriter, Professional Voice Over Talent, Human friend to The Band of Puppets and Owner of Yims FoodsBand of Puppets is a zany group of puppet characters created and performed by my husband Eric Neal. I’m the human friend to these lovable puppets and we offer creative and interactive musical shows that are entertaining to young and old.

Yims Foods was founded in 2011, and we offer  pickled vegetables, preserved fruits, jams and jellies. We source our produce primarily from local farms. All of our products are made in small batches with special attention to quality. Bringing the art of pickling back to the people! of course with the help of my mother Judy, and wonderful graphic designer John Lefler.

What is your songwriting process?
Emotional garbage that’s stirring around in my head and needs spitting out. a necessity.. it’s like the kiss of death for me… some form of closure, or a healthy way to process something that might otherwise turn toxic… or if it’s something pleasant… a way of capturing that feeling to always be able to recreate again and again and again and again. a moment in time.

What are you most proud of?
getting untangled…. what means nothing and what matters to me.

People play music for emotional, financial, spiritual, social, egotistical reasons…. there’s no right or wrong but for ME, it’s all about sharing this language of emotions with the people I love, the connection with the musicians i’m privileged to work beside, the audience that takes the time to listen, that person who has been moved by a song, and the experience it is for them. The communal aspect of sharing is so thrilling to me.

What is your favorite songwriting lyric?
Moons and junes and ferris wheels,
the dizzy dancing way you feel
as every fairy tale comes real
I’ve looked at love that way
but now it’s just another show,
you leave ’em laughing when you go
and if you care, don’t let them know,
don’t give yourself away

What advice would you give to young songwriters?
Everyone is different…so why you write may be also. That being said.. If you’re looking for honesty and authenticity, try to maintain a writing style that is true to your character, something you would really say. I have old journals when I started out that I’d be mortified to read now… SO many terrible odes to lost loves, and ugh … those shakespearean tragedies. i was 16. …I was a punk. i’m not discrediting my personal experience i just wished i’d narrated from my own perspective and didn’t try so hard. I was looking for an outlet to express what I was feeling and I suppose it’s trial and error…but the worse thing was to go above and beyond to explain something ..Making it flowery as possible. Maybe all it needed was a simple explanation… in my simple words, truth from my lips. it’s my own thought process and explanation, that’s as real as you get.
I really think over thinking is overrated.

Camille on the Web
Website
Facebook Page
Twitter

Bonus Material

To view Camille’s selected playlist and 2 personal videos she selected, please go to;

http://www.ourscattereddreams.com/songwriting-blog.html

All interviews and Bonus Materials will be archived alphabetically HERE for easy access in the future.

Thanks for stopping by.  Please share this page and site with fellow music lovers.

See you back soon,

Mike